Duty Of Disclosure: What, When And Why?

You’re negotiating a property settlement with your former partner. What do you need to disclose? What does your ex need to disclose? What even is “disclosure” and what happens if you don’t do it?

Disclosure What When And Why

In the context of a property settlement, “disclosure” basically means both partners disclosing to each other their full financial circumstances.

Disclosure can be a complex area of law, and it is important that you obtain professional advice to ensure you fully understand your obligations. To get you started, below are the “What, When and Why” of disclosure. 

  • WHAT do I need to provide?

    The answer to this question will depend on the facts and circumstances of you case, but in a nutshell, it means all of the documents necessary to understand your financial circumstances (including your direct financial circumstances and your indirect financial circumstances).

    This includes your income, expenses, assets, liabilities, superannuation, and financial resources. If you or your partner has an interest in a business, a Trust or company, an inheritance that is expected to be received imminently, or a an investment opportunity about to come to fruition, all relevant documentation and information pertaining to these will need to be disclosed.

  • WHEN do I need to provide my disclosure?

    The timing of disclosure will be different in in each case. The most important time to ensure that you and your partner have complied with your duty of disclosure is before a negotiation has commenced and a deal agreed to.

    It is important to understand that both you and your partner have an ongoing obligation to disclose your financial circumstances. In other words, you cannot provide your disclosure documents once and then refuse to update your disclosure as time goes by, if your property settlement hasn’t been completed. For example, if your income changes, if you buy/sell a property, if you receive an inheritance, if your bank accounts change, this must all be disclosed.

    If you have been unable to reach an agreement and either you or your partner want to commence Court proceedings, there are specific Court Rules about disclosure and you need to ensure that you adhere to those Rules.

  • WHY do I need to provide disclosure?

    Firstly – you need to fully understand the asset pool and the deal you are negotiating. How can you assess the deal and know if it is in your interests if you do not understand the full financial picture?

    Secondly – your partner also needs to understand the asset pool and the deal.

    Thirdly – your lawyer needs to be able to ensure that all of the ‘i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed’. How can this be done if your lawyer does not understand the asset pool and the deal? Similarly, how can your lawyer provide you with advice on the deal if he/she does not know the full financial circumstances of the couple?

    Fourthly – it is a risk management tool. If, after a property settlement has been entered into, it comes to light that a party has not fully disclosed his/her financial circumstances, there is a risk that the other partner may make an Application to the Court to have the property settlement set aside. Not only will you potentially lose the deal, you may end up with a worse settlement and an order that you pay your partner’s legal fees of the proceedings. Not to mention the time, stress, cost and uncertainty of litigation.

If you’re thinking about getting started, or if you want to know where you stand, give us a call or send us an email today.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on skype
Share on pinterest

Share This

Select your desired option below to share a direct link to this page

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on skype
Share on pinterest
Share on email